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Microsoft Security Essentials


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#1 wayne937

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 01:25 PM

I want to find a good security program/programs that I can recommend to my friends. I have been checking out a website in reference to "Microsoft Security Essentials". Is this a good program to use? Would I need to run any other adware removal tools long with it? I just watched a video at www.microsoft.com/security/essentials. The video advised to uninstall all other antivirus before using. Does this include spyware removal tools like Spybot Search and Destroy, and Ad-Aware, or can these tools be used along side of Microsoft security Essential? Another question; is their any current tutorial on the removal tools given here on bleeping computer. The ones I see are all outdated. Thanks.

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#2 cryptodan

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 01:28 PM

Id recommend Microsoft Security Essentials along side with Malwarebytes Antimalware, and Super Anti-Spyware.

#3 wayne937

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 02:56 PM

Cryptodan, thanks for the information. I am trying to get a general concensus on the best malware to you. I'll list yours preferences along with the rest.

#4 cryptodan

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 03:18 PM

Please perform the following, so that we can get the exact specs of your computer. This will better assist us in helping you more.

Publish a Snapshot using Speccy

The below is for those who cannot get online

Please take caution when attaching a text file to your post if you cannot copy/paste the link to your post, you will need to edit it to make sure that your Windows Key is not present.

#5 wayne937

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 09:25 PM

Cryptodan, I just wanted to find out what people would recommend, in general, in order to get rid of malware for windows XP, and newer systems. I have used Spybot, Malwarebytes and Ad-Aware. They seem to do a fairly good job. Would you recommend these three malware removers? I never know when I may be wanting to use these malware removal tools. I am wintering in Florida in a 55 and older park. Tnese folks need help every now and then to get rid of malware, and other problems, of course. Thanks for you help.

#6 wayne937

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 09:33 PM

Cryptodan, I just checked out the link you provided on Speccy, and printed out how to use it. That is a neat tool. Thanks you so much. I will most likely be using that tool in the future.

#7 wayne937

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 10:40 PM

Cryptodan, I just checked a video at http://www.microsoft.com/security_essentials/support.aspx?mkt=en-us#mainNav in reference to Microsoft Security Essentials. It says in the first video before installing this program, make sure to uninstall any other antivirus, or spyware remover from your computer. I have always been under the impression that you could only run one antivirus program. but I thought you could run 2, or possible 3 antispyware programs with most antivirus programs. I guess you can't do that with this one. Apparently is does everything that a virus program, and a antispyware program does, together, and you would only need this one to do the job. Listen to that first video, and see if you agree with me. Thanks.

#8 cryptodan

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 05:01 AM

Can you please run speccy and post the link?

#9 menton1

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 05:57 PM

If I already have AVG Free and Zone Alarm Free, would you recommend disabling them and using Microsoft Security Essentials instead?

#10 quietman7

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 07:04 AM

. I have always been under the impression that you could only run one antivirus program. but I thought you could run 2, or possible 3 antispyware programs with most antivirus programs.

Yes, using more than one anti-virus program is not advisable. Why? The primary concern with doing so is due to conflicts that can arise when they are running in real-time mode simultaneously and issues with Windows resource management. Even if one of them is disabled for use as a stand-alone scanner, it can affect the other and cause conflicts. Anti-virus software components insert themselves into the operating systems core and using more than one can cause instability, crash your computer, slow performance and waste system resources. When actively running in the background while connected to the Internet, they both may try to update their definition databases at the same time. As the programs compete for resources required to download the necessary files this often can result in sluggish system performance or unresponsive behavior.

Each anti-virus may interpret the activity of the other as suspicious behavior and there is a greater chance of them alerting you to a "False Positive". If one finds a virus or a suspicious file and then the other also finds the same, both programs will be competing over exclusive rights on dealing with that virus or suspicious file. Each anti-virus may attempt to remove the offending file and quarantine it at the same time resulting in a resource management issue as to which program gets permission to act first. If one anit-virus finds and quarantines the file before the other one does, then you encounter the problem of both wanting to scan each other's zipped or archived files and each reporting the other's quarantined contents. This can lead to a repetitive cycle of endless alerts that continually warn you that a threat has been found when that is not the case.

Anti-virus scanners use virus definitions to check for malware and these can include a fragment of the virus code which may be recognized by other anti-virus programs as the virus itself. Because of this, many anti-virus vendors encrypt their definitions so that they do not trigger a false alarm when scanned by other security programs. Other vendors do not encrypt their definitions and they can trigger false alarms when detected by the resident anti-virus. Further, dual installation is not always possible because most of the newer anti-virus programs will detect the presence of others and may insist they be removed prior to download and installation of another. If the installation does complete with another anti-virus already installed, you may encounter issues like system freezing, unresponsiveness or similar symptoms while trying to use it.

To avoid these problems, use only one anti-virus solution. Deciding which one to remove is your choice. Be aware that you may lose your subscription to that anti-virus program's virus definitions once you uninstall that software.

Anti-virus vendors recommend that you install and run only one anti-virus program at a timeYou can always supplement your anti-virus by performing an Online Virus Scan.

In contrast, as a general rule, using more than one anti-spyware program like Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware, SuperAntispyware, Windows Defender, Spybot S&D, Ad-Aware, Spyware Terminator, etc. will not conflict with each other or your anti-virus if using only one of them for real-time protection and others as stand-alone scanners. In fact, doing so increases your protection coverage without causing the same kind of conflicts or affecting the stability of your system that can occur when using more than one anti-virus. The overlap of protection from using different signature databases will aid in detection and removal of more threats when scanning your system for malware. However, competing tools may provide redundant alerts which can be annoying and/or confusing as a result of the overlap in protection.

If using multiple real-time resident shields (TeaTimer, Ad-Watch, MBAM Protection Module, Spyware Terminator Shields, etc.) together at the same time, there can be conflicts when each application tries to compete for resources and exclusive rights to perform an action. They may identify the activity of each other as suspicious and produce alerts. Further, your anti-virus may detect suspicious activity while these programs are scanning (reading) files, especially if it uses a heuristic scanning engine, regardless if they are running in real-time or on demand. The anti-virus may even detect as threats, any malware removed by these programs and placed into quarantined areas. This can lead to a repetitive cycle of endless alerts or false alarms that continually warn a threat has been found if the contents of the quarantine folder are not removed before beginning a new security scan. Generally these conflicts are more of an annoyance rather than the significant conflicts which occur when running two anti-virus programs in real time.

FYI: mvps.org is no longer recommending Spybot S&D or Ad-Aware due to poor testing results. See here - (scroll down and read under Freeware Antispyware Products). Ad-Aware has even been placed into the Installers Hall of Shame for bundling and pre-checking Google Chrome during the installation. Also read Lavasoft Turning to the Dark Side? written by a former volunteer (now a MVP) who provided support for Ad-Aware but no longer uses the program.

As for Spybot S&D, most people don't understand how to use TeaTimer and that feature can cause more problems than it's worth. TeaTimer monitors changes to certain critical keys in Windows registry but does not indicate if the change is normal or a modification made by a malware infection. The user must have an understanding of the registry and how TeaTimer works in order to make informed decisions to allow or deny the detected changes. If you don't have understanding how a particular security tool works, then you probably should not be using it. Additionally, TeaTimer may conflict with other security tools which do a much better job of protecting your computer and in some cases it will even prevent disinfection of malware by those tools.

More effective alternatives are Malwarebytes Anti-Malware and SUPERAntiSpyware Free.
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#11 wayne937

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 07:18 AM

Thank you, quietman7, I appreciate your reply. Yes! I have always heard that it is not a good idea to run two different virus programs. Your post reinforces what I have always heard about tunning two diffeent virus programs. I use to like the older versions of AVG, but I don't thik AVG has the quaity it once had. I use the AVG on one of my computers and it allowed a nasty vius of some kind get into this computer. I had to reinstall back to factory defaults as I could not get back in windows. I have Noton360 on this computer. So far it has done me a good job.

#12 quietman7

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 07:30 AM

I have been disappointed with AVG ever since they made a decision in April 2010 to partner with LimeWire and promote the use of peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing, a security risk which can make your system susceptible to a smörgåsbord of malware infections, remote attacks, and exposure of personal information.

NOTE: With the release of AVG 2011, there have been numerous complaints about issues and conflicts with other security tools like Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware. Unlike previous versions, AVG 2011 cannot be effectively disabled to prevent it from interfering with other security tools...after restarting the computer, AVG re-enables all protections. Read these related discussions:There have been reports of issues with the computer starting properly on 64-bit Windows sytems for which AVG has had to release these fix instructions.

There have also been reported problems with computers after using new features like PC Analyzer and PC Tuneup which purport to fix registry errors in order to make the system more stable and various optimizing tools which can make changes to system settings.

I do not recommend the routine use of registry cleaners/optimizers as they are extremely powerful applications that can damage the Windows registry by using aggressive cleaning routines and cause your computer to become unbootable. Using registry cleaning tools unnecessarily or incorrectly could lead to disastrous effects on your operating system such as preventing it from booting properly. For routine use, the benefits to your computer are negligible while the potential risks are great.

Even MajorGeeks, a popular download hosting site, has issued a Statement on AVG Free 2011 and has removed its Editor's Pick listing.

For these reasons, I no longer recommend AVG as a free alternative.
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#13 wayne937

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 08:40 AM

quietman7, have you ever heard of a virus by the name of aiosoftware. It is listed on this website http://www.ehow.com/how_6873420_remove-aio-software.html I am working on a friend's computer and each time she starts the computer it tries to install this software. You have to cancel it 3 times in order to get into windows. I have tried for hours to find what is causing this. So far, no luck. I have ran two different spyware programs, her Norton program, but the computer seems to be free of any viruses, or spyware. I have given up trying to fix it. After it is cancelled 3 times the computer seems to run ok. I have searched for this file under the search function without any luck. It seems to indicate the file is on a newwork, but this computer is not associated with a network. She does have a HP (AIO) printer. I think this maybe associated with a file in the printer even though eveything works ok with the printer. We had a hard time of setting this printer up last year, to get it to work properly. She does not want to uninstall and reinstall it. Please don't spend any time on this issue as she is not willing to uninstall and reinstall the printer. If you have any thoughts that pop out at you, I would appreciate hearing about it. I have checked the registry files, and all startup folder for this file, or program, but could not find it. The thing that puzzles me is why is it trying to install this program since it cannot even find it on the computer doing a search. It maybe a corrupt file, or a missing file from the HP printer software. Anyway, like I stated, don't spend any time trying to analyze this. Let me know if something pops out in your mind. I tried everything I could find on Google.

#14 quietman7

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 08:57 AM

AIOSoftware and the issue you describe appears to be related to HP. See here.

If you have an issue or problem you would like to discuss, please start your own topic. Doing that will help to avoid the confusion that often occurs when trying to help two or more members at the same time in the same thread. Further, posting for assistance in someone else's topic is not considered proper forum etiquette.
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#15 wayne937

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 09:12 AM

Quietman7, this is on a topic which I started earlier. I was only asking you if the AIOsoftware could possible be a virus which I had read that it was on the website I referred to in my last post. Sorry if I made a mistake.




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