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Won't come out of standby; continuously restarts


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#1 ClickJ

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 08:19 PM

Hello, I've run into a problem with my computer coming out of standby. I have:

Dell XPS M1730
Windows XP Pro SP3
Intel Core 2 Duo T9300 2.5GHz
3GB RAM

I have my computer set to go to standby after 45 minutes. I have previously had BSODs when coming out of standby, but I haven't had any trouble since reformatting. About a week ago though, I pushed the power button to bring the computer out of standby and the only thing that happened was that the NumLock indicator light went off. HDD light didn't flash, speaker/touchpad LEDs didn't change to their correct colors, etc.

I had to turn the computer off, and when I turned it on, it would get to the Windows screen and it would load for a few seconds (the blue bar would scroll across a couple of times), but then it would hang. After being frozen for a few seconds, my screen would turn white, and the computer would restart, and repeat the process of hanging at the Windows screen and restarting.

I decided to turn the computer off and try again the next morning, and it started just fine. This happened a second, time and I was also able to start it just fine after leaving it sit overnight.

I had the same issue last night, and was able to start it fine this morning...so instead of letting the system go into standby, I just shut it off...turning it on every once in a while to check email and such. However, now it will not start normally at all - it just hangs at the Windows screen and reboots until I shut it off. The only way I can get my computer booted up is in Safe Mode.

I recently had to have my video card replaced due to overheating (according to Dell) at the end of September, and I thought overheating may again be an issue since it would work after leaving it sit overnight. My computer is on a hard, flat surface though, and it does start in safe mode...and the most intensive thing I've done on it in months is make a PowerPoint.

There is no particular program I am running before it goes into standby - generally Firefox or Word.

I do not know if this is a hardware or a software issue...I have performed scans with AdAware and Avast - here is what Avast has come up with (that return after each removal):

C:\WINDOWS\system32\autochk(3).exe:BAK
C:\WINDOWS\system32\autochk(4).exe:BAK
C:\WINDOWS\system32\autochk(5).exe:BAK
C:\WINDOWS\system32\autochk(6).exe:BAK

It lists the type for them all as "rootkit: hidden file"

AdAware did not find anything and, MBAM came up with absolutely nothing.

There have been no hardware changes and no new program installations recently, and I did a system restore to a date before I started having this problem - but that did not help.
The only potential solution I have come across so far said to put the original Windows disc in and use the utilitiy that scans and replaces any missing/corrupt Windows files. I do not have access to that disc while I am on break, so I have not been able to try it.

When Windows does start normally, I have not noticed any weird behavior that would lead me to think I have a virus, malware, etc., but I do have an HJT log saved, which I did not post here as per the instructions. I will try using my Windows disc as soon as I get back to school - but with final projects and term papers etc. coming due the next two weeks, this is a ridiculous time for my computer to go on the fritz, so I thought I would try to get a jump on the solution early.

Thanks so much for your help!

Jason

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#2 Andrew

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 03:41 AM

It sounds like Windows is crashing and automatically rebooting. This is the default behavior under Windows, but we need to disable it to get the crash info for diagnosis.

Follow the instructions here to disable automatic restating.

Now, the next time it fails to boot properly, you should get a blue screen with white text describing the technical details of the error (similar to the image below.)

Posted Image

Write down all the information under the "Technical Information" section and post it here. You'll need to manually shut down afterward. This can be done by pressing and holding the power button for (usually) five seconds.

x.png
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#3 ClickJ

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 10:52 AM

Thanks for the reply - I followed the instructions on that site, and rebooting after a crash is already disabled. But, I did discover how to stop it from asking me which OS I want to boot to!

Again this morning, after letting it sit overnight, it booted up just fine.

I believe the error I got before when I was having problems coming out of standby was an IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL, though I don't know if that would be of any help now since the symptoms are completely different.

#4 garmanma

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 01:09 PM

Corrupt video drivers do not play nice with standby/hibernate
Mark
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#5 ClickJ

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 02:01 PM

I'll check on that when I get back to school...I never mess with video drivers - I checked around for ones for my video card and there were so many options I figured I would just stick with what I had rather than try something else.

I did set my computer to hibernate instead of standby, and it came back just fine this time *knock on wood*. I'm hoping it's a Windows problem - I've got a copy of Windows 7 on the way and I'm going to start fresh after the semester is over.

#6 ClickJ

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 07:37 PM

I updated my video driver and the problem seems to be fixed! It boots up fine now...hopefully that will last.

Is there anything in particular that would cause the video driver to become corrupt with no other warning signs, or is it just one of those things that happens?

Just kidding...though my computer boots up fine now, it randomly restarts.

Edited by ClickJ, 27 November 2009 - 08:52 PM.


#7 hamluis

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 09:06 PM

Strangely enough...file damage happens routinely, always for a reason...but what those reasons might be, most of us cannot determine.

It's not important to know why a given file becomes damaged...it's important to know that Windows will not typically advise you of such until the damaged file creates what Windows considers a major problem.

File Corruption & Its Consequences - http://www.smartcomputing.com/Editorial/ar...3.asp&guid=

Did you follow the instructions/suggestions posted by Amazing Andrew re disabling the auto reboot on crash setting/function?

Louis

#8 ClickJ

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 10:30 PM

Interesting.

I did follow those instructions, however auto reboot was already disabled. I am going to run in safe mode for now, and tomorrow I will try doing a repair installation of Windows XP.

#9 ClickJ

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 10:25 PM

I was able to do a Repair installation of Windows XP tonight. It has not been completed long enough to know if it worked or not...however, my computer did restart randomly twice in the middle of the upgrade installation (it would get to "installing devices" and hang with 34 minutes remaining...after the second restart though, the installation finished).

However, after the repair install was completed, I selected "No, I would not like to register at this time" because my internet was not hooked up...I looked away for a second and when I looked back a lovely BSoD was awaiting me:

MACHINE_CHECK_EXCEPTION

Stop error is: 0x0000009C (0x00000000, 0xB8344050, 0xF2000040, 0x00000800)

I understand that this is a general hardware failure of some type? I have never got an MCE BSoD before, and none of my hardware is overclocked.

#10 hamluis

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Posted 29 November 2009 - 09:02 AM

From http://www.aumha.org/a/stop.htm:

0x0000009C: MACHINE_CHECK_EXCEPTION
This is a hardware issue: an unrecoverable hardware error has occurred. The parameters have different meanings depending on what type of CPU you have but, while diagnostic, rarely lead to a clear solution. Most commonly it results from overheating, from failed hardware (RAM, CPU, hardware bus, power supply, etc.), or from pushing hardware beyond its capabilities (e.g., overclocking a CPU).


I would start with CMOS battery (replacement)...and then move on to diagnostics for the hard drive, then the RAM.

CMOS Battery Replacement - http://www.liverepair.com/encyclopedia/art...cmosreplace.asp

The fact that you have had overheating issues in the past...IMO, makes every other component suspect (since heat is the enemy of anything in a system).

How to Diagnose and Replace a Failed PC Power Supply - http://www.wikihow.com/Diagnose-and-Replac...PC-Power-Supply

How To Diagnose RAM Problems - http://www.technibble.com/how-to-diagnose-bad-ram/

Hard Drive Installation and Diagnostic Tools - http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/28744/hard-drive-installation-and-diagnostic-tools/

Louis




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